Gourlay Feathery Golf Ball

Until 20 March, the Stirling Smith has the privilege of hosting the famous Ryder Cup Heritage exhibition. The ancient Royal Burgh and City of Stirling has golfing heritage of its own. It is recorded in the accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland that on 29 March 1506 James

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The print is one of a large collection in the Stirling Smith Art Gallery and Museum.

Looking to Stirling from St. Ninians

This view dates from the mid 1740s, and is certainly before 1 February 1746, when the retreating Jacobite army accidentally blew up St.Ninian’s Church, leaving only the tower which stands today. Weaver’s Row to the left of the church also still remains. The view is taken from the old Glasgow

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Hugh Green

Hugh Green’s Stirlingshire – a Retrospective

  James Wedlake joined the Stirling Smith staff as an Intern, on the Museums Galleries Scotland Adopt an Intern scheme in September. A graduate in the History of Art from the University of Cambridge, James (23), has encountered and tackled many of the issues involved in curatorship, and is now

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Body snatcher William Burke’s Cap and Skin

Last week, Stirling Ghost Walk man David Kinnaird introduced Hallowe’en visitors to the more gruesome aspects of the Stirling Smith’s collection.   These include the deerskin and leather cap worn by the notorious body snatcher and murderer William Burke (1792 – 1829), who with his accomplice Hare committed at least

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Sailor’s Valentine, Black History Month

This is a very good example of a sailor’s valentine of the 1850s in the Stirling Smith collections. It is currently one of the objects highlighted for Black History Month. Sailor’s valentines were made from tiny sea shells arranged in interesting patterns and encased in octagonal glazed boxes. Tradition has

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Annie Croall, Founder of the Stirling’s Children’s Home

Founder of the Stirling’s Children’s Home, Annie Knight Croall (1854-1927) is one of the unsung heroines of Scottish history.  She was the daughter of the first curator of the Smith Institute, and came from Leeds to Stirling at the age of 19.  A deeply spiritual person, her work for neglected

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Alexander Bonar of Ratho (1750 – 1820), Sir Henry Raeburn

Earlier this year, the Stirling Smith received an important bequest of a Raeburn portrait from the late Bruce Ritchie of Allan Park. Sir Henry Raeburn was the foremost Scottish portrait painter of his time, and this is the first Raeburn portrait to come into the Smith collections. The subject of

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Battle of Bannockbur Anniversary Celebrations, 1914

Celebrating Bannockburn

The 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn, 23-24 June 1314, is now less than a year away.  Pictured here is a flower covered car from the 600th anniversary in 1914, one of a series of photos in the Smith’s collection showing the great pageant procession through Stirling, from King’s

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Unveiling the Raeburn

The Smith’s first portrait by Sir Henry Raeburn, a bequest by the late Bruce Ritchie of Allan Park, was unveiled by the Right Honourable Sir George Reid.  The event marked the end of the building contract to renew the roof of the Smith.  Sir George pointed out that the subject,

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Margaret Shirra and Son

We know little of the details of this mother and child portrait, which is in the Smith collections and is currently on show in the Stirling Heads Exhibition.  Margaret Shirra (nee Low) was the wife of James Shirra (1812-1888), a Stirling draper.  The portrait was painted by Stirling-born artist Sir

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